Category: Environment

A History of Headquarters Mill

A few years ago, I wrote articles for the township newsletter, The Bridge, while holding the position of Township Historian. When Charles Frischman became Township Historian he took over the job of writing a regular column for the newsletter. When I stopped writing, I was working on a series about the mills of Delaware Township. The next mill in the series was to be the mill in the village of Headquarters, known variously over the years as Opdycke’s Mill, Tyson’s Mill, Holcombe’s Mill, Conover’s Mill, Carrell Mill and Headquarters Mill.

Now that The Post is up and running, it seemed like a good time to finish that series on the Mills of Delaware Township. Another good reason to do this is the effort being made by members of the …

Historic Bridge to get Appropriate Maintenance. Cooperative Approach finds Local Talent, Resources

Here we have some Local Delaware News that happened on Tuesday December 2, repair work resumed on the stone arch bridge at the foot of Pine Hill Road. The New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (NJHPO), Hunterdon County Engineering Dept. (HCE), and members of Delaware Township Committee and Delaware Township Historical Society (DTHS) met at the bridge in the Covered Bridge Historic District Tuesday morning at 8 AM to settle the details of work to be done on the 160 year old stone arch. The bridge is a contributing structure in the District, which is listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

Like the stone arch bridge on Lambertville-Headquarters Road, the Pine Hill Road bridge had not had its arch repointed in a long time. A group of …

The Moore Family Cemetery

This cemetery has to be one of our oldest. It is located on land that once belonged to Jacob Moore, one of Amwell’s earliest settlers, who lived from about 1690 to about 1770. It is one of the prettiest locations in the township, overlooking rolling hills and farm fields. The cemetery is surrounded by a stone wall and at one time had a wrought iron gate.

According to Moore family tradition, Jacob Moore came to Amwell around 1705, one of the very first Europeans to come here, and established his plantation near Haines Road and Rosemont-Ringoes Road. He and his wife Amy are probably buried in the Moore cemetery, but their stones cannot be found.

Hiram Deats wrote that there are two other burying grounds on this farm near the …